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angeles daily news." that is all for the program, thank you for joining us. we will now go to the senate homeland security and government affairs committee where chairman lieberman is going to be hosting a meeting about the ongoing threats. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> i was struck yesterday by reading a gallup poll in one of the newspapers that showed a significant decrease in concern about terrorism among the american people. now, this is understandable, particularly because of the stress that current economic conditions have put so many american families under, but as the three witnesses know very well, the threat is still all too real. our committee knows that as well. it's our job and yours to be focused on protecting our homeland and our people from violent extremist and terrorists no matter what the state of public opinion is about it at the moment, and that's why, of course, we are so happy that -- and grateful that you are here today. the tragedy of 9/11 is a daily reality for the three of y
for being with us on this friday. let's tell you what we're doing next. we will take you to the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c. and the panel session that looks at what we have learned nine years after the 9/11 attacks. there is an evolving terrorist threat and there will be several speakers. live coverage begins shortly. thank you for being with us on this friday morning and we will see to morning -- tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. on "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> we are leave at this national press club this morning where former 9/11 commission lee hamilton and tom cane will speak with reporters about how terrorist threats have changed since 9/11. the two are now co-chairs of the national security preparedness group of the bipartisan policy center. it's an organization founded three years ago by former senate majority leader tom daschle. bob dole, georg
%. if i may proud independence. -- i'm a proud independent. if you look at our infrastructure, who uses mass transit more -- middle class, lower class, or upper class? i would say is middle or lower. guest: certainly, it depends on where you are. the certainly, the average bus- writer in america has a slightly lower income -- the average bus rider in america has a slightly lower income than the average american household. however, the express between fort worth and dallas, for example, it tends to be middle and upper income the use that. across america, all strata of society use public transportation and depending on where the transit goes and what type of transit it is combined with the market is that they are seeking to reach, it could be of -- it could be either very high income, that is with the commuter rail lines in new york or chicago or san francisco are an example of. it can be no american income americans going back and forth -- it can be middle-class american income going back and forth to work. it is a wide spectrum of people that use public transit. when i give these statis
that were donated to us. these were original patents that were provided. some of them date back to the early 1800's. is a reminder of what makes this country so great, our inventiveness. are originally there were a bunch of plates up there and i decided i have the whole plate room so i don't need another one year. >> do you have but george washington year? >> i kept george washington, i have a brown blanket. this was donated by steven spielberg to the -- i have abraham lincoln. this was donated by steven spielberg to a bill clinton. it is by norman rockwell. you have these guys cleaning the torch. it is a reminder that we constantly have to renew the flames of our democracy. >> when people come in this room, how do you notice them react? >> well, you know, somebody said this is the greatest home court advantage you have in this office. i think people feel a certain reverence for this space, because it symbolizes the presidency and it symbolizes what has been extraordinary record of tough tough decision -- of tough decisions and monumental decisions made in this room. usually people have a bi
he will embrace the notion and he his republic c >> the u.s. senate returned from their summer break. the nomination is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. eastern. the chamber returns to work and small-business lending bill that has been stalled since midsummer. follow the senate live on c-span 2. and the house returns from its summer recess tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern for legislative business. they will take up a handful of bills under suspension of the rules. those are scheduled for 6:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow, members will take a resolution honoring the ninth anniversary of 9/11. on wednesday, they will work on a couple of measures designed to boost domestic manufacturing and a bill dealing with energy efficiency programs for rural areas. watch live house covered starting tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> with the house and senate back in session, followed congress using the cspan video library congressional chronicle. beginning cadets a complete -- you can index a complete list of congressional members. it is free any time. watch you what you want, when you want. >> the people who
recent recession that demonstrates the u.s. is very strong in its reaction to the cheonan incident. they joined at the very beginning in the rescue operations, and also, [unintelligible] -- the were in strong support of the u.s. administration. this is the largest area ever conducted in the caribbean peninsula. -- kirby and peninsula. i might say that this is the reincarnation of the incident that happened between 1977 and 1993. it was a deterrent to north korean leadership and rain that in north korean policies -- north korean policies. one side effect of this is china's reaction. when we conducted this exercise in the wake of the cheonan sinking, the chinese reaction was unusually harsh. i think it has awakened at the international community. it is central in the war, as reflected in the sense of china. china had some objection to this joint exercise. for example, july 15 -- "we formally oppose any foreign militaries placed in the yellow city, undermining china's security." and second also, this was a joint week emphasized by a high- ranking military -- this was a jointly emphasi
political settlement. what makes us think that we can make some progress now? that is really only very recently that all the necessary elements of the campaign have come together. despite the fact that there have been western forces there since 2001, it is only rarely now that the necessary number of forces are deployed in afghanistan, as general petraeus has recently been making clear. one of our announcements had been a 40% increase in the development going to afghanistan. we have an economic protests that that is bought out by the afghans themselves. all these things have come together in recent times. the single most difficult problem we have faced in international affairs, but i think now we have the finest military minds, a good military plan, the necessary quantities of development and the experience of provincial reconstruction, and motivated key ministers in afghanistan, to have the best chance for success that it is possible to put together. i believe is right to maintain an effort to succeed, because i think the consequences of abandoning that effort now would be extremely s
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
with north korea, the primary responsibility is north korea's. it brought us to this point, and if we are going to move to a better place, it will be up to north korea to demonstrate it is prepared to engage constructively. >> >> that is really up to north korea to take responsibility for any of its actions. we are all trying to interpret what has happened and work collaborative lead to interment -- collaborative leak to determine the best path for. >> to you believe it depends on china? whenever something happens in the region, there the first for consultation. >> we call the six party process because we of the country's that armas significantly affected by and have the ability to shape peace and security in the region. china has a special responsibility. it has been a leader within the six-party process and we will look to china to demonstrate leadership going forward. china has had recent high-level meetings with the north koreans. we will vow to their sharing their perspective with us -- we will value their sharing their specs -- their perspective with us. they have a special role
europeans, they were well educated, emigrating to the u.s.. last year there were only three within the group by participated in. my colleague graduated in u.s., spending $200,000 of her own money on education. she went back to europe, and in these other countries that have no immigration -- no education and the immigration is a policy provided to the u.s.. guest: our population is multifaceted. our program shows that every time a child is given the chance, they can learn. in arkansas there was not much of a european population. all of those kids were achieving. the poverty level was 85%. we are proving again that kids can achieve, given the proper courses and teacher training. host: tom luce, thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you. host: go to our website, c-, to find out the events we are covering today in washington. the president will give his back to school speech at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. a stakeout after meeting with caucus members with mitch mcconnell after the meeting on the small business bill. live coverage on c-span 2. thank you for watching.
is by former u.s. attorney general michael mukasey. again, president obama will have an announcement this afternoon in the white house rose garden. we will have coverage at 1:30 p.m. eastern. until then, an author who has written a book critical of the obama administration. ng this friday, september 17, david limbaugh returns. his latest book is called "crimes against liberty: an indictment of president barack obama." as with the start -- start our discussion, for an author, had a new spirit of the lettuce nonfiction best-seller list. "the new york times" as the book and a number one spot, the second week on the list. "wall street journal" nonfiction, number two. and the combined list of fiction and nonfiction books at "usa today" #28, moving up and not -- #30. why is is selling so well? guest: i think it is resonating. people in america are very scared about what is going on about the bankrupting spending the federal government is doing and the destruction of our liberties and the assaults of individual liberties and assaults on the states, the war against the state, how president o
their jobs. and today, mr. chairman, they are seeing us stand up for the american manufacturing and american workers and demand a level playing field and an end to china's currency manipulation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. brady: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: mr. speaker, it's now my pleasure, a deep privilege to yield a minute to our distinguished speaker, nancy pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. the speaker: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank you for the recognition and of yielding of time from the distinguished chairman of the ways and means committee. w and means committee. i think him for bringing this legislation to the floor and i thank mr. murphy -- bipartisan murphys for their leadership in this important legislation. mr. speaker, for so many years, we have watched china-u.s. trade deficit grow and grow and grow. and today, we are finally doing something about it by recognizing that china's manipulation of the currency
have to give us adequate time to get to the floor so we can respond to the bills and i am recognized and am making a statement because i'm really upset. this is the way the majority has been running the congress, mr. speaker. . you wonder why the american people are upset with majority is because of this. if you don't give adequate notice to the ranking member to be to the floor on bills, people are going to know. you know they are going to know? because i'm going to tell the story. rules matter around this place. now, let me go back to the first bill. the only reason i want to mention this is because i want to thank, you just passed it, we are going to do it by voice, let me tell you what's upsetting. it's the parliamentarian. from the time you drop that bill and the parliamentarian makes sure it gets to the jurisdictions. some might get amended and some other committee thinks they want a view on it. what happens is the majority not giving a doggone about the minority puts bills on this floor no matter what they do so long it's in comfort with someone else. they don't care about the
speaking i would appreciate it. tell us your name and any ebullitions you might have. please wait. we have microphones coming around to you. >> thank you. i am mike billington. i do not know if you went to the conference in quantico last week, but at that conference are raise the exact question you have drawn, the elite of the chinese and russians and others that the evidence is an adequate. the response from different generals as we do not need no stinking evidence. [laughter] look at the provocations, it isn't their character, therefore we have to accept this is true. you did not mention the issue, which has concerned me about this, which is why in this area of very high south korean and u.s. and nato anti-submarine warfare facilities and sonar equipment and so forth there appears to have been no son are evidence whatsoever -- no sonar evidence whatsoever? we all know that north korea said they had nothing to do with this, but i am wondering what you did north korea thinks about this. in other words, who could have done it, who in the west? is that the british? whaty is the view of the n
think someone can come up with the exact figure, and all of the resources being used for a human destruction, why can they not be used to improve the quality of life, living conditions, and the structure, and given a future to the people of india? [unintelligible] this mahomet gandhi was alive today, what kind of device which he did to the indian leadership? >> we will take that as a comment, not a question. [laughter] the gentleman in the back. >> we are prisoners of the past. when you talk about military, there are at least two wars in the past. we have to project that in a linear fashion. i would like you to comment on the macro side in the sense that the borders were imposed by the british on the locals. the chinese border was [unintelligible] then, [unintelligible] acted on his temper, winston churchill -- and his emperor, winston churchill. why is this border so solid? secondly, on pakistan, you have an enormous tragedy. what are the opportunities for the bigger the deal maker? >> let me comment on that, not the last part, because we are still discovering what is happening
. it mandates that funds provided by the legislation shall be used to supplement and not to supplant other energy efficiency funding. it says that no report has to be filed with the comptroller general regardling the extent to which funds provided by the legislation that are used to support commercial or industrial energy measures. it prohibits any additions to direct spending with respect to the legislation. it forbids funds from being used to purchase personal property, including manufactured homes but allows funds to be used for modifications to manufactured homes. . it prohibits regulations regarding a home labeling program, it also prohibits the wrongful use or diversion of program funds, as well as prohibits providing funds to any contract who are employs any person who has been convicted of or pled guilty to any form of sexual assault. finally it prohibits federal employees from receiving loan fund fs they have seriously delinquent tax debt, have received a payment in violation of the liheap or have been officially disciplined for viewing, downloading or exchanging pornography on fe
deserved for being a phenomenal leader and the u.s. congress for three decades, who's sitting right here in the front row. and i've just got to say how much all of it congressman phil crane has done for the cause. [applause] [alause] i've got to say one of the really early thrilled by head when i was enacted in politics as a young guy with cp had a guest there wasa young republican national convention in new orleans where i'm from and standing on a riverboat going down the river and congressman crane was there and was so approachable and he will remember it come up and i remember it to this day comes thathey're talking to me for the longest time, drinking a beer as if he had nothing better to do than talk to this college kid. and again, thank you, congressman crane. [applause] also one other shout out. my fellow yaf word member at georgetown university in the mid-80's and fellow fresan dorm for who we were in the same freshman dorm for, fellow iter, he is fed by a heck of a lot more people across this country than i did and is done great things to the conservative cause. my friend tried
to certain entities that will use the funds to make loans to consumers to implement energy efficient measures involving structural improvements and investments in cost effective commercial off-the-shelf technologies to improve home energy use. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. mr. arcuri: thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from nebraska rise? >> request permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. fortenberry: mr. speaker, he was called a young man of integrity and respect, a great marine who loved the marine corps, a loving husband and father. this is how the late staff sergeant michael a. bach was remembered by those who knew him. he was conducting operations in the hellman province in afghanistan when his patrol came under fire and died from those injuries on august 13. he had served four deployments in beeth iraq and afghanistan and was awarded the purple heart, navy and marine corps achie
for years and they have elected me to that. >> in new hampshire -- >> u.s. civil rights commission is holding a conference on civil rights in the 21st century and includes speeches and panel discussions on various aspects. business leaders and scholars discuss the legal and social tools available for fighting discrimination. >> including continued racial and ethnic disparities in important measures of well-being and success. this discussion obviously includes a consideration of public policy options, both old and new, but it goes beyond public policy by also asking about the limits of government action and what the right mix of government and nongovernment action should be. in a pre-conference conference call with the panel members, we identified the following questions as relevant. they don't have to answer them all, but i'm going to repeat them anyway and if they go off on more brilliant things i might turn them back to a few of these questions. first, beyond rigorous enforcement of anti-discrimination law, ca can and should be done by government to narrow racial and ethnic dispa
carbon emissions, let me tell you what will not work. it would not work to use cat and trade. cap and trade is being put out as the way to solve this problem. cap and trade is the notion that we will set a limit on how much carbon emissions there will be. we will deal out the cards to people who get to the met this much carbon, and then we will say what -- now somebody else wants to reduce carbon, you have to buy one of these emissions permits. at the same meeting where i met t.j. rodgers, i also met jeff in help from general electric. just in health -- jeff, after giving an impassioned speech about how greene general electric -- she might have thought they were green electric rather than general electorate -- how greene generally lesser was and how -- how greene general electric was and how deserving they were to get this, more efficient engines, and so on and so forth. he capped it quite well when i asked him a question, were they really that green or with a just lobbying? he got a little bit mad, and he said, if you are not at the table, you're on the menu. let that soak in for
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20